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Archives: Research

How the Norwegian salmon industry extracts nutrition and undermines livelihoods in West Africa

31st Jan 24 by Vera Hoveling

Feedbacks latest report shows how the Norwegian salmon industry’s voracious appetite for wild fish is driving loss of livelihoods and malnutrition in Africa. Farming carnivorous fish in Europe harms fishing communities in West Africa by depriving them of a resource fundamental to their nutrition and their livelihoods. Salmon are carnivorous, and farmed salmon depend on the nutrients provided through fish oil in particular, gained through grinding up smaller, wild fish. At Feedback, we have evidence that in feeding these smaller fish (sardines, sardinella, ethmalosa, etc.) to Scottish farmed salmon, major micro-nutrient losses occur.

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setting a target that is fit for food and the climate

22nd Nov 23 by Vera Hoveling

New report by Feedback Europe finds that high eu biomethane target is unrealistic and unsustainable: as European reform of gas markets is underway, our analysis debunks the assumptions behind the high EU biomethane target and calls for a much lower target that is fit for food and the climate.

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The 35bcm biomethane target – at best unattainable, at worst an environmental disaster

20th Sep 23 by Bobby Allen

Feedback EU’s analysis of the feedstock assumptions underlying the 35 billion cubic meter biomethane target shows that at best it will be simply impossible to reach this target. At worst, strong policy support for the target will lock in dangerously unsustainable agricultural, land use and energy practices.

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English summary of our Dutch report “Valse Bingo”

27th Jun 23 by Bobby Allen

The greenwash tactics used by supermarkets to distract us from the emissions of meat and dairy sales.

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De tactieken van supermarkten om klanten af te leiden van de klimaatuitstoot van vlees en zuivel

27th Jun 23 by Bobby Allen

Supermarkten gaan sluw te werk en maken net als de fossiele industrie gebruik van greenwashing tactieken om hun uitstoot te verbergen. Herken jij ze?

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Our annual report!

20th Jun 23 by Bobby Allen

Are you curious to read about what’ve done in 2022? Find out in our annual report!

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Rabobank’s financial services to the global meat and dairy companies fuelling climate change

31st Jan 23 by Bobby Allen
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Klimaat en Vlees Supermarkt Scorecard

11th Oct 22 by Bobby Allen

De zes grootste supermarkten in Nederland hebben samen bijna 90% van het marktaandeel voor levensmiddelen in handen en voor veel mensen is naar de supermarkt gaan de enige optie om voedsel te kopen. Met deze scorecard wil Feedback EU de top 6 Nederlandse supermarkten beoordelen op hun transparantie, ambities en acties: nemen zij de verantwoordelijkheid om de klimaatcrisis aan te pakken en minder vlees en zuivel te verkopen? Bekijk hoe goed jouw supermarkt scoort.

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NO TIME TO WASTE

21st Sep 22 by Bobby Allen

We urge the European Commission to set a legally binding target of a 50%, farm-to-fork reduction in food waste by 2030 and recommend that policymakers, organisations, and individuals join us in calling for these targets to be adopted.

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EU food supply and solidarity response to the war in Ukraine

16th Mar 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

“Both the COVID-19 pandemic and the war in Ukraine have shed light on the weaknesses of the
European food system.”

Read our joint letter on EU food supply and solidarity response to the war in Ukraine.

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recommendations for UK policymakers

9th Mar 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

A policy brief outlining recommendations for UK policymakers based on the results of FLAVOUR, an innovative project funded by the EU’s Interreg 2 Seas Mers Zeeën 2014-2020 programme that aims to tackle food waste while supporting inclusive jobs in the social economy.

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Maximising sustainable nutrient production from coupled fisheries-aquaculture systems

2nd Mar 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

Our research reveals that eating the wild-caught fish destined for salmon farms would allow nearly 4 million tonnes of fish to be left in the sea while providing an extra 6 million tonnes of seafood.

 

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Climate mitigation efficacy of anaerobic digestion in a decarbonising economy

21st Feb 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

Anaerobic digestion (AD) – the process of producing “biogas” from organic matter like crops and wastes – has presented itself as the silver bullet to everything from producing green gas for heating and transport, to producing fertiliser for our crops. However, our research shows that, at best, AD is a sub-optimal sticking plaster solution, and at worst, it is sometimes actually perpetuating the problems it claims to solve.

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A New Front in Divestment Campaigning

19th Jan 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

The UK’s local councils are pouring £238 million in pension fund money into industrial livestock investments, fuelling a destructive industry which causes climate change, deforestation, human rights abuses and industrial-scale animal cruelty.

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Dutch Supermarkets are avoiding responsibility for one third of their emissions

3rd Nov 21 by Christina O'Sullivan

This report explores the role of Dutch supermarkets in addressing the country’s climate footprint by taking responsibility for the environmental impact of their high meat and dairy sales.

The report is in Dutch, a summary in English is available here.

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Blindspot – How lack of action on livestock methane undermines climate targets

31st Oct 21 by Christina O'Sullivan

We contributed to Changing Markets report on methane. Climate scientists have confirmed that a focus on methane emissions – in addition to measures designed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions – will be crucial in determining whether global heating can be kept below 1.5°C.  Although the livestock sector is by far the largest contributor of human-induced methane emissions, the report reveals that both the biggest meat and dairy-producing countries – with some of the highest methane emissions – and the largest meat and dairy corporations are oblivious to the problem.

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The Shift to Paris-aligned Diets and Investor Risk in the UK Retail Sector

19th Oct 21 by

Food retailers face a new climate and sustainability front: in order to meet net zero goals, the UK must reduce meat and dairy consumption by least 50% by 2030 and beyond. Yet, currently, the majority of retailers are failing to face up to both long- and short-term physical and transitional climate risks associated with their meat and dairy sales. As markets continue to price climate risk into the value of equity securities, setting and meeting ambitious and accountable science-based targets on product emissions will become a bellwether of a retailer’s long-term viability. Investors have the opportunity to review potential retail investments in Feedback’s Meat and Climate Scorecard to assess their responsiveness to supply chain and regulatory risk.

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Addressing methane emissions through demand-side measures in the food system

20th Aug 21 by Jessica Sinclair Taylor

Action to reduce methane emissions can avoid 0.3°C of warming by 2045, according to UNEP. While reduction in fossil fuel methane emissions is both vital and achievable, this briefing sets out the benefits to concurrently implementing global action plans to address the role of agriculture and food systems in generating methane emissions. This briefing sets out the case for the UK Presidency of COP26 to advocate for effective demand-side food system measures to achieve major methane reductions in the agriculture sector, bringing 1.5 degrees within reach.

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the potential of nutrient recycling to contribute to a reduced livestock sector, within planetary boundaries

20th Jul 21 by Christina O'Sullivan

We need to eat significantly less meat but is it necessary to cut out meat and animal products from our diets completely? Our paper describes the important role that livestock should play at recycling unavoidable food waste in the food system and defines what less and better meat really looks like. Our evidence based definition of ‘better meat’ is meat from animals that are reared only on food waste and by-products and do not graze or eat crops from land that could be used to grow human-edible crops. In fact, eating some meat, fed exclusively on leftovers, maximises the nutritional output of our land and uses less land than a vegan diet.All this can be done safely by treating the food waste in specialist treatment facilities.

Its important that money saved from feeding animals on leftovers does not lead to an increase in industrial livestock, or this will undo the climate benefits. The climate and land footprint of the UK’s pigs and chickens is predominantly abroad as the feed is imported. Our leftovers model creates a real opportunity to end the reliance on feed imports and their devastating effects on rainforests and the climate.

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FEEDBACK ANNUAL REPORT 2019/20

2nd Jul 21 by Christina O'Sullivan

Feedback’s annual report 2019-2020 covers Feedback’s work in an unprecedent year, the pandemic brought to the fore many vulnerabilities of the food system, including reliance on global supply chains, the concentration of the groceries market, persistent food insecurity and health inequalities due to nutrition. This created a public space for many of our issues, and our advocacy, media and programmatic work to make food and justice central to the food economy became prominent this year.

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Meat and Climate Scorecard

17th Jun 21 by

UK supermarkets control over 90% of the UK groceries market share and for many people, going to the supermarket is the only option for buying food. Supermarkets therefore have a responsibilty to ensure the food they sell isn’t hurting the planet, including meat and dairy. With this scorecard, Feedback set out to assess the top 10 UK supermarkets on their work to address the climate crisis by reducing the environmental impact of the meat and dairy they sell. See how well your supermarket scored.

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Wood biomass and BECCS

16th Jun 21 by Christina O'Sullivan

Scientists urge governments to act aggressively over the next decade to keep global warming to 1.5°C and avert the worst consequences of climate change. Pivotal to that effort are policies to quickly end reliance on dirty energy; support a rapid transition to genuinely non-emitting and renewable energy; and protect forests and other intact ecosystems as critical carbon sinks. Industrial scale biomass-burning in the power sector threatens all three pillars of climate action and should not be subsidised.

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Anaerobic Digestion feedstocks

16th Jun 21 by Christina O'Sullivan

Anaerobic Digestion (AD) of biomass feedstocks such as wastes and bioenergy crops is often a suboptimal use of land and resources, and must therefore be kept within its sustainable niche as a last-resort waste management option1. Any support for the growth of AD must be designed in a manner which does not undermine waste prevention efforts or divert land from environmentally preferable uses.

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why parliamentary pensions investments in Big Livestock companies matter

26th May 21 by Jessica Sinclair Taylor

The UK prides itself on being a world leader on climate action, and in particular deforestation. New legislative proposals from the UK government plan to introduce a due diligence obligation on companies trading in forest risk commodities – but exempts the financial sector which finances this trade. This report analyses sample investments held by the Parliamentary Contributory Pension Fund (PCPF) and reveals that Members of Parliament hold pensions investments in a fund holding US$67m in stock from companies among the top 35 largest global meat and dairy companies. The fund includes shares of JBS, one of the biggest meat producers in the world whose business practices have been repeatedly linked to deforestation in the Amazon rainforest and Cerrado region. These investments demonstrate why regulation is needed: MPs who strongly support an end to U.K. complicity in global deforestation will go on the record while, unknowingly, paying their own money into a fund that backs some of the worst offenders in forest destruction. Domestic legislation on deforestation which fails to address one of the most integral parts of the supply chain, finance, leaves gaping loopholes. Incorporating a due diligence obligation on finance sector organisations would close many of these gaps.

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